Training vs. Coaching

I’m amazed by the number of people that provide coaching. I’m also amazed because many of them are not even coaching. They are training. Big big difference.

Mark Joyner wrote an article that says it quite well.

Coaching can help, but there’s a problem …Unless you get direct access to a real – truly qualified – coach yourself, you’re not really getting coaching.

Heck, I’ve seen people charge clients $8,000 for a year of coaching only to find that the clients call in for their coaching session and the coach pushes the “play” button on a recording.

Yikes.

Sorry, that ain’t coaching. It’s training.

(And usually sub-standard training at that, unfortunately. Few companies take the time to perfect step-by-step [and fun!] training systems like we build at Simpleology. It costs a lot more to do what we do, but after reading this series I’m sure you’re beginning to understand why we take the effort.)

Oh, here’s another one you may have seen …

You buy coaching and you do, in fact, get a real live coach.

But …

Your coach ends up being an unqualified kid who really doesn’t know what he’s doing. Such a coach could really wreak havoc on your business by sending you careening down the wrong path.

Simpleology could have cashed in on the coaching business a long time ago, but we chose not to. Quality and value are more important to us.

The fact is, someone who really knows how to build a multi-million dollar business simply can’t afford to spend time coaching you personally, unless you’re willing to pay them outrageous sums.

(I used to ask $2,000 an hour for phone consultations myself, but I don’t even do that anymore because my time is worth more than that.)

Think about it – if someone could build million dollar businesses, why would they charge you $8,000-$20,000 to train you personally for a year?

“Error. Does not compute.”

That’s why the coaching is usually performed by recording, or by someone under-qualified. It’s the only way to make the economic model work.

Simpleology Blog